Cookie Classics Made Easy by Brandi Scalise

The author has a very no-nonsense approach to this book and it definitely lives up to the ‘made easy’ title. With only a quick introduction, the meat of the book is many different types of cookies that typically have under four steps to make. Realistically, the only thing you need is a simple set of tools/ingredients and you are good to go and start baking. For once, I had nearly every ingredient already in the spice/cooking pantry and only needed special items such as white chocolate chips or macadamia nuts.

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The book is around 95 pages, almost all of them the cookie recipes. The selection is quite vast and although it has the staple chocolate chip or peanut butter, there are also great variations that bring a new spin to the taste. There’s nothing too exotic here – just a nice variety of recipes using fairly staple/easy-to-get items.

The recipes come in these categories: Chocolate Love, Fruit and Nut, Sugar and Spice, All-Time Favorites. The introduction page gives a very quick list of items needed (5 or 6 at most). At the back are the usual metric conversion charts.

Each recipe is one full page with very large type. The ingredients are on the left and the steps are numbered on the right. There is a very quick description/intro, some variation tips (e.g., loaf-cookies) and serving size is given at the end. Since the author is a photographer, there are also photos for every single cookie. I always appreciate when there are photos since I like to know how the cookie should turn out looking (and it makes it easier to quickly peruse the book to see what recipe I want to try that night).

Obviously, this isn’t a health conscious book (try not to flinch with the corn syrup) – it’s for making delicious cookies. What we have is a beautifully presented, easy to use, quick and easy cookie recipe book that lives up to the title. Reviewed from an advance reader copy provided by the p

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